Author Archive

Baked Oat & Quinoa with blueberries from the forest

Posted on: September 4th, 2013 by modini

This delicious recipe I have made a countless of times after I discovered it. The soft consistence, the combination of oat, banana and blueberries cant go wrong, and on top of it, lots of brown butter! Yes, we are talking totally comfort food here!  Dont miss out on this one! Its easy to make, and you kan keep it in the fridge for several days and have it for breakfast, lunch or dinner even if thats what you are craving, cold or heated again, because this is actually a good balanced meal with proteins, fat and good carbs..

This recipe have been used in Dharma for smaller groups – and it has been warmly welcomed for a change to the traditional porridge, this is a great alternative for the coming autumn and winter, where our bodys wants more warm food.

Baked Oat & Quinoa with blueberries

1,5 cup oat, rolled

0,5 cup quinoa

1 tsp baking powder

1,5 tsp cinnamon

1/2 tsp salt

1 tsp pure vanillaextract

1,8 cup rice or oatmilk

2 tbsp oliveoil

2 egg

2 ripe bananas

180 gr frozen blueberries

3 ss unsweetened applesauce

2-3 ss honey or agavesirup

 

Preheat oven to 180 degrees.

 

Mix all the dry ingredients in a bowl – and set aside. In another bowl you put the eggs and whisk a little with a fork, then you add the vanillaextract, applesauce, stevia, honey/agavesirup, milk and the oliveoil and mix again. Set aside.

If you dont have quinoaflakes, you just use 2 cups with oat, or other flakes. It will still be delicious.

Find a ovenproof form in the size, more or less, like a lasagneform. Cut the bananas into pieces and place in the bottom of the form. Then you add the bowl with wet ingredients into the dry ingredients and combine lightly with a spoon. Take out the frozen blueberries, add into the mix, and combine just a little bit again, and place the mix over the bananas. Its important that the bluberries are frozen when you add them to the mix, if they are starting to defrost they will turn it all blue, and it doesnt matter to the taste, but it doesnt look that great when its all blue.
Bake for 35 – 45 minutes, depending on your oven, but it should be golden on top.
While its baking you can prepare the browned butter, you cant skip this and use “only” normal butter, because this makes a whole lot of difference!
Its very easy, and you start out just the same way as when you make clarified butter, you just take it a little longer. Put a slice of good, organic butter in a pan over medium heat, let melt and eventually it will start to divide in three layers (this should only take a few minutes).  Foam will appear on the surface of the butter, and this you take away with a spoon and discard. The milk solids will fall to the bottom, and the clarified butter is floating in the middle. Normally the process stops here because now you have clarified butter (ghee), but to make browned butter, also called Hazelnut Butter, you have to let it cook more so the milksolids in the bottom starts to “burn”, than it will become aromatic and toasty and will impart a hazelnut color to the butter. When that happens you will smell it.

You can contol the nuttiness and the intensity of the butter by varying how long you cook it before you remove it from the milksolids. This butter you can keep in the fridge and use over oatmeal, pancakes, waffles, pasta, tarts….for an extra touch.
When the baked goods are finished, let cool for 10 minutes, then drizzle the browned butter on top, dont hold back here…(its just so delicious) place yourself on the coach with a woollen blanket and enjoy every single bite 🙂

With love,

Modini

Roasted Chickpeas by the lake

Posted on: September 4th, 2013 by modini

How blessed we have been this summer with such a beautiful warm weather. No wollen socks and raincoats needed for Satsang this year. And many meals could be joined outside, in our beautiful garden and by the lake. For those who are living here in Norway and stays here during the long winter, those days are really precious and we know to use the opportunity to have our meal outside on warm, sunny days.

This dish we have made many times now during the retreats. I found this recipe in a cookbook and there they eat it just as a snack, like we eat popcorn or peanuts…. But I thought this would be great in a wok, and Im trying to make us use more of these guys (the chickpeas), because they are so good and healthy. Chickpeas are the earliest cultivated legume and are loaded with fiber, they are high in protein and is supporting our bloodsugar levels. Personally I love them, is the legume that I use most at home. But the thing about chickpeas and almost any legume, they need to be soaked overnight or at least 8-10 hours and then cooked for some time, and many of us dont have time or forget this, but what you can is to cook up a lot while you first do it then you freeze them in plastic bags or other containers. In this way you can always have chickpeas available for a meal.. just adding some vegetables, some spices….a little rice and suddenly you have a great lunch:)

Roasted Chickpeas

1,5 cup cooked chickpeas

2-3  tbsp olive oil

1 tsp smoked paprika

1 tsp sweet paprika

1/3 tsp cayennepepper

1/2 tsp salt

Preheat oven to 200 degrees – mix the spices with the oil and blend in the chickpeas, make sure they are well coated with the oilmix.

Place chickpeas on a baking sheet and roast in the oven for 20-25 min – make sure to stir them around after 15 min so they get evenly roasted.

Serve with your choice of woked vegetables and rice:)

130802_NO_Sujan_076

With love,

Modini

Crispy Winter Silence

Posted on: February 20th, 2013 by modini No Comments

Ten days of silence retreat has just come to an end… And what a beautiful journey! Outside the temperatures have been moving from minus three to minus twenty-three degrees and inside the heat has been increasing during these days, softening the hearts in each one of us and creating a beautiful atmosphere of intimacy and warmth. The key-word of this retreat has been simplicity: everything has been unfolding so smoothly and, even though the cooking inside might have been strong from time to time, the practical side of the retreat has been happening effortlessly, as if we were all carried by a larger energy and each one naturally taking our part in the whole.

In the kitchen the focus has been to keep the food simple and nourishing. Every night we served miso-soup with fresh sprouts and rye-crackers on the side. The lunch was a bit richer, but still pure and appetizing. For us this retreat has given inspiration how to prepare food that is supporting our journey inwards. We feel the passion burning to create food that is tasty, simple and wholesome, and which is truly accommodating both the body to let go of old toxins and tensions and the mind to turn inwards, keeping the choices few when you come to the table to eat.

 

We also learned something new about miso soup in this retreat: that it is important to keep it below 47.7 degree Celsius to retain the full value of the nutrients in the miso, which means that the soup should be served lukewarm! It might not sound so appealing to eat a soup that way in the middle of the winter, but in fact it has felt just perfect to be able to drink it out of the bowl without scalding the tongue and actually being able to really taste and feel everything in it.

 

Enjoy a hearty, fresh and light meal!

 

Much love from Khudai & Modini

 

Recipes:

Miso Soup     4 portions

1 liter water

2 tsp bouillon powder

2-3 ss miso paste

1-2 ss soyasauce

200 gr tofu,  in cubes

2 spring onions, finely chopped

200 gr vegetables (we used both carrots, cauliflower, broccoli and mushrooms) You can use what you have on hand, just see that you cut them thin, since they will be added in the end and will not have a much cooking time.

Bring the water to boil and add the boullion. Take away from heat and let temperature come down to 47-48 degrees. Blend in the miso and than add the tofu, soyasauce and vegetables – mix and let sit for a few minutes just to get a little heat through. Add the springonion and serve.

 

Mungbean Sprouts

 

Place mungbeans in a big bowl and pick out the small stones to throw. Mungbeans tend to have some stones and you recognise them on their size, they are smaller  (but still green in colour) than the beans and totally hard, like stones (not nice to suddenly chew on one like that!) Put mungbeans to soak in cold, fresh water overnight. In the morning you rinse them in cold water and put in a bowl with a lid or cloth on top. Rinse 2-3 times a day. After 2 days you have nice, crunchy and fresh sprouts which is great to add in the misosoup or in any salad.

mung_bean_sprouts__91752_zoom

 

 

Crispy Winter Silence

Posted on: February 20th, 2013 by modini No Comments

Ten days of silence retreat has just come to an end… And what a beautiful journey! Outside the temperatures have been moving from minus three to minus twenty-three degrees and inside the heat has been increasing during these days, softening the hearts in each one of us and creating a beautiful atmosphere of intimacy and warmth. The key-word of this retreat has been simplicity: everything has been unfolding so smoothly and, even though the cooking inside might have been strong from time to time, the practical side of the retreat has been happening effortlessly, as if we were all carried by a larger energy and each one naturally taking our part in the whole.

In the kitchen the focus has been to keep the food simple and nourishing. Every night we served miso-soup with fresh sprouts and rye-crackers on the side. The lunch was a bit richer, but still pure and appetizing. For us this retreat has given inspiration how to prepare food that is supporting our journey inwards. We feel the passion burning to create food that is tasty, simple and wholesome, and which is truly accommodating both the body to let go of old toxins and tensions and the mind to turn inwards, keeping the choices few when you come to the table to eat.

 

We also learned something new about miso soup in this retreat: that it is important to keep it below 47.7 degree Celsius to retain the full value of the nutrients in the miso, which means that the soup should be served lukewarm! It might not sound so appealing to eat a soup that way in the middle of the winter, but in fact it has felt just perfect to be able to drink it out of the bowl without scalding the tongue and actually being able to really taste and feel everything in it.

 

Enjoy a hearty, fresh and light meal!

 

Much love from Khudai & Modini

 

Recipes:

Miso Soup     4 portions

1 liter water

2 tsp bouillon powder

2-3 ss miso paste

1-2 ss soyasauce

200 gr tofu,  in cubes

2 spring onions, finely chopped

200 gr vegetables (we used both carrots, cauliflower, broccoli and mushrooms) You can use what you have on hand, just see that you cut them thin, since they will be added in the end and will not have a much cooking time.

Bring the water to boil and add the boullion. Take away from heat and let temperature come down to 47-48 degrees. Blend in the miso and than add the tofu, soyasauce and vegetables – mix and let sit for a few minutes just to get a little heat through. Add the springonion and serve.

 

Mungbean Sprouts

 

Place mungbeans in a big bowl and pick out the small stones to throw. Mungbeans tend to have some stones and you recognise them on their size, they are smaller  (but still green in colour) than the beans and totally hard, like stones (not nice to suddenly chew on one like that!) Put mungbeans to soak in cold, fresh water overnight. In the morning you rinse them in cold water and put in a bowl with a lid or cloth on top. Rinse 2-3 times a day. After 2 days you have nice, crunchy and fresh sprouts which is great to add in the misosoup or in any salad.

mung_bean_sprouts__91752_zoom

 

 

Gangi`s “Best Ever” Esekielbread

Posted on: January 7th, 2013 by modini No Comments

I remember very well the first times I visited Hedalen…it was pure magic for me. I would be driving from Bergen, and for each mile I left behind me I felt lighter and extremely joyful. Like suddenly a hidden source started opening inside, pouring out all the “fun” that was kept well down at home. The moment I came over the mountain from Nesbyen and approaching Hedalen, was the peak of the journey, I could feel like I entered a secret garden or something, like “Alice in Wonderland”….. Through these hours of driving it happened an amazing transformation, I was a new person when I arrived in Dharma Mountain. Wow, is good to remember these moments….

Back to the reason for this article. Gangi. And her breads. And the fact that I was always passing her house coming to Hedalen, and I was always thinking about her standing there in the kitchen and making breads… (which most probably she was not..)And telling myself to remember to order some bread for me to pick up on my way home…

So I got to know that Gangi was baking her own Esekielbreads at her home, and also selling them to those who wanted to buy. As I was always interested to eat more “healthy”I would of course buy form her, especially after I got to know that this bread is made from sprouts, very little yeast, no sugar, and using speltflour. Her breads was so delicious and moist. I have been trying to make them myself sometimes, but I dont really nail it. Not like hers. I mean, mine is good also, eatable for sure, but a little more dense, not that moist and light as Gangis. So I asked Gangi if she would share her recipe and instructions with us, and she was more than happy too, so here it comes.

Thank you Gangi!

Love Modini

 

“Best Ever Esekielbread”:

 

70 grams whole barley

140 grams whole spelt

140 grams white beans

140 grams green lentils

140 grams millet (hirse) – cooked and rinsed in cold water

3 dl water

5 grams fresh yeast

2 – 2,5 seasalt

17 dl cold water

2 kg wholemeal spelt (sammalt)

1 kg finely ground spelt (fin)

Soak barley, spelt, beans and lentils covered with water for about 12 hours.

Rinse and transfer the mix to a seed bank or bring back to the bowl and keep rinsing them 2-3 times for 2-3 days. After they have sprouted put them in a food processor together with 3 dl water and the cooked millet – blend until well combined. Transfer the mix to a big bowl and add the rest of the ingredients – only mix the yeast with the water (cold water) before you add it. Knead the dough very well and leave it to rise for about 8 hours.

TIPS; make the dough in the night and finish the breads in the morning.

After the dough is done rising, again you should knead it well. Butter (or use oil) and flour some loafpans. Gangi doesnt remember how many breads that came out of this dough, but she found that using 1,5 liter loaf pan and adding about 900 grams dough for her was a good size for the breads. When the dough is in the forms, they should rise again for 2 hours. Than you place them in a cold oven, put the temperature to 175 degrees and bake the breads for about 1 – 1,5 hour, depending on the size of your breads.

Good luck and happy eating!

 

 

Gangi`s “Best Ever” Esekielbread

Posted on: January 7th, 2013 by modini No Comments

I remember very well the first times I visited Hedalen…it was pure magic for me. I would be driving from Bergen, and for each mile I left behind me I felt lighter and extremely joyful. Like suddenly a hidden source started opening inside, pouring out all the “fun” that was kept well down at home. The moment I came over the mountain from Nesbyen and approaching Hedalen, was the peak of the journey, I could feel like I entered a secret garden or something, like “Alice in Wonderland”….. Through these hours of driving it happened an amazing transformation, I was a new person when I arrived in Dharma Mountain. Wow, is good to remember these moments….

Back to the reason for this article. Gangi. And her breads. And the fact that I was always passing her house coming to Hedalen, and I was always thinking about her standing there in the kitchen and making breads… (which most probably she was not..)And telling myself to remember to order some bread for me to pick up on my way home…

So I got to know that Gangi was baking her own Esekielbreads at her home, and also selling them to those who wanted to buy. As I was always interested to eat more “healthy”I would of course buy form her, especially after I got to know that this bread is made from sprouts, very little yeast, no sugar, and using speltflour. Her breads was so delicious and moist. I have been trying to make them myself sometimes, but I dont really nail it. Not like hers. I mean, mine is good also, eatable for sure, but a little more dense, not that moist and light as Gangis. So I asked Gangi if she would share her recipe and instructions with us, and she was more than happy too, so here it comes.

Thank you Gangi!

Love Modini

 

“Best Ever Esekielbread”:

 

70 grams whole barley

140 grams whole spelt

140 grams white beans

140 grams green lentils

140 grams millet (hirse) – cooked and rinsed in cold water

3 dl water

5 grams fresh yeast

2 – 2,5 seasalt

17 dl cold water

2 kg wholemeal spelt (sammalt)

1 kg finely ground spelt (fin)

Soak barley, spelt, beans and lentils covered with water for about 12 hours.

Rinse and transfer the mix to a seed bank or bring back to the bowl and keep rinsing them 2-3 times for 2-3 days. After they have sprouted put them in a food processor together with 3 dl water and the cooked millet – blend until well combined. Transfer the mix to a big bowl and add the rest of the ingredients – only mix the yeast with the water (cold water) before you add it. Knead the dough very well and leave it to rise for about 8 hours.

TIPS; make the dough in the night and finish the breads in the morning.

After the dough is done rising, again you should knead it well. Butter (or use oil) and flour some loafpans. Gangi doesnt remember how many breads that came out of this dough, but she found that using 1,5 liter loaf pan and adding about 900 grams dough for her was a good size for the breads. When the dough is in the forms, they should rise again for 2 hours. Than you place them in a cold oven, put the temperature to 175 degrees and bake the breads for about 1 – 1,5 hour, depending on the size of your breads.

Good luck and happy eating!

 

 

Thai Red Curry

Posted on: December 30th, 2012 by modini No Comments

While the retreat went on in Brasil, the retreat also went on here in Dharma, with Audio Satsangs 4 days a week and some meditations in between, all to keep us warm in the heart and stay connected there… With a beautiful, silent white landscape, and daylight only until midday, and not to mention – 20 degrees, is all great tools to help us go in and stop. (what else to do in – 20 anyway;)

But we need food too, and in the winter, warm comforting food is prefered. So the last day of the retreat (in Brasil) we met in Dharma to have lunch together. I made a dish of Red Curry Sauce with Salmon filets and Jasmin rice, which was warmly welcomed and appreciated. Some asked for the recipe, so here it comes.

This is for you Bhavya:)

Love Modini

 

Thai Red Curry

Ingredients:

1 yellow onion, chopped

2 zucchini, cut into 1 cm pieces

2 ts red curry paste

160 ml coconut milk

225 gr firm tofu or you can use cooked chickpeas or salmon filets like I used for us, the salmon you can cut into pieces and add directly in the sauce or cook whole on the side and  than you pour over the sauce when serving.

225 gr chopped cauliflower

12 asparagus spears, trimmed and cut into 2.5 cm pieces (you can also use one bag, 250 gr, with frozen asparagus)

120 ml vegetable broth or water

Fresh coriander leaves (optional), but if you love coriander like me, it really makes the “kick”.

Instructions:

Heat a little oil in a large pot over medium heat. Stir in the onion and a big pinch of salt.

Saute until the onion starts to become translucent at the edges, a couple of minutes. Stir in the zucchini and cook for 1 minute more.

In the meantime, in a small bowl, mash the curry paste with a few tablespoons of the coconut milk. Add this to the pot and stir until the onions and zucchini are well coated. Stir in the remaining coconut milk.

Bring it to a simmer, then add the tofu (or chickpeas, salmon….), cauliflower and asparagus.

Cover and cook just long enough for the tofu (or fish) to heat through and the asparagus and cauliflower to lose its raw edge, a couple minutes. Uncover and add the broth. Stir and taste. Now here`s the crucial part : You need to salt appropriately. If your broth was salty, you will need less than if you used a less-salty broth. Add a little at a time until the flavors in the curry really pop.

If you dont have cauliflower, broccoli is a nice option, but truly, you can throw in almost any vegetable you might have on hand in this sauce. I have used frozen green peas, carrots, corn, potatoes, mushrooms…its all good in there.

I always serve this dish with Jasmin Rice, but you can also eat it like it is, like a soup.

Enjoy!

 

Thai Red Curry

Posted on: December 30th, 2012 by modini No Comments

While the retreat went on in Brasil, the retreat also went on here in Dharma, with Audio Satsangs 4 days a week and some meditations in between, all to keep us warm in the heart and stay connected there… With a beautiful, silent white landscape, and daylight only until midday, and not to mention – 20 degrees, is all great tools to help us go in and stop. (what else to do in – 20 anyway;)

But we need food too, and in the winter, warm comforting food is prefered. So the last day of the retreat (in Brasil) we met in Dharma to have lunch together. I made a dish of Red Curry Sauce with Salmon filets and Jasmin rice, which was warmly welcomed and appreciated. Some asked for the recipe, so here it comes.

This is for you Bhavya:)

Love Modini

 

Thai Red Curry

Ingredients:

1 yellow onion, chopped

2 zucchini, cut into 1 cm pieces

2 ts red curry paste

160 ml coconut milk

225 gr firm tofu or you can use cooked chickpeas or salmon filets like I used for us, the salmon you can cut into pieces and add directly in the sauce or cook whole on the side and  than you pour over the sauce when serving.

225 gr chopped cauliflower

12 asparagus spears, trimmed and cut into 2.5 cm pieces (you can also use one bag, 250 gr, with frozen asparagus)

120 ml vegetable broth or water

Fresh coriander leaves (optional), but if you love coriander like me, it really makes the “kick”.

Instructions:

Heat a little oil in a large pot over medium heat. Stir in the onion and a big pinch of salt.

Saute until the onion starts to become translucent at the edges, a couple of minutes. Stir in the zucchini and cook for 1 minute more.

In the meantime, in a small bowl, mash the curry paste with a few tablespoons of the coconut milk. Add this to the pot and stir until the onions and zucchini are well coated. Stir in the remaining coconut milk.

Bring it to a simmer, then add the tofu (or chickpeas, salmon….), cauliflower and asparagus.

Cover and cook just long enough for the tofu (or fish) to heat through and the asparagus and cauliflower to lose its raw edge, a couple minutes. Uncover and add the broth. Stir and taste. Now here`s the crucial part : You need to salt appropriately. If your broth was salty, you will need less than if you used a less-salty broth. Add a little at a time until the flavors in the curry really pop.

If you dont have cauliflower, broccoli is a nice option, but truly, you can throw in almost any vegetable you might have on hand in this sauce. I have used frozen green peas, carrots, corn, potatoes, mushrooms…its all good in there.

I always serve this dish with Jasmin Rice, but you can also eat it like it is, like a soup.

Enjoy!

 

Nutbutter

Posted on: November 12th, 2012 by modini No Comments

 

Is nice to have a blog on the site, isnt it? A little stream of different sharings from friends, some recipes and some tips and reminders… Its nice!

This night with had a spontanious, cozy happening at Dharma. We gathered in the kitchen, prepared some food while Jaitang filled up our glasses with wine, we sat down around the table, ate, talked and laughed…a perfect way to spend a cold winternight.

So, I came home and felt to share another recipe that became popular during this summer retreat, and which many of you also asked for the recipe. This time is the nutbutter, which you found every morning on the breakfasttable, and I guess it turned up during the evening meals as well. So simple and easy, the nutbutter.

Love Modini

 

NUTBUTTER

 

3 dl almonds

3 dl walnuts

1,5 dl pumpkinseeds (optional)

seasalt

 

Instructions:

Preheat the oven to 180 degrees. Place the nuts and seeds spread on a baking sheet and roast in the oven for about 7 – 10 minutes.

Let cool a bit. Put the nuts and seeds in a food processor and blend, and the trick is to let it blend for some time, what happens than is that the oils that is inside the nuts will come out so it will become a smooth “butterlike” spread. You might have to stop and s crape down the sides in between to keep it going in the start, but when the oils start to come out it will go by itself. Add salt in the end and blend again.

Someone like it a bit on the salty side, like myself, and some like it less salty, so you just taste your way to it and see how you like it.

This butter you can use in so many different ways, like in baking, in smoothies, add into sauces….I love this combination ; ricecake, nutbutter and sliced banana on top (especially when the nutbutter is on the salty side you get the salty/sweet combo that never fails ;=)

Nutbutter

Posted on: November 12th, 2012 by modini No Comments

 

Is nice to have a blog on the site, isnt it? A little stream of different sharings from friends, some recipes and some tips and reminders… Its nice!

This night with had a spontanious, cozy happening at Dharma. We gathered in the kitchen, prepared some food while Jaitang filled up our glasses with wine, we sat down around the table, ate, talked and laughed…a perfect way to spend a cold winternight.

So, I came home and felt to share another recipe that became popular during this summer retreat, and which many of you also asked for the recipe. This time is the nutbutter, which you found every morning on the breakfasttable, and I guess it turned up during the evening meals as well. So simple and easy, the nutbutter.

Love Modini

 

NUTBUTTER

 

3 dl almonds

3 dl walnuts

1,5 dl pumpkinseeds (optional)

seasalt

 

Instructions:

Preheat the oven to 180 degrees. Place the nuts and seeds spread on a baking sheet and roast in the oven for about 7 – 10 minutes.

Let cool a bit. Put the nuts and seeds in a food processor and blend, and the trick is to let it blend for some time, what happens than is that the oils that is inside the nuts will come out so it will become a smooth “butterlike” spread. You might have to stop and s crape down the sides in between to keep it going in the start, but when the oils start to come out it will go by itself. Add salt in the end and blend again.

Someone like it a bit on the salty side, like myself, and some like it less salty, so you just taste your way to it and see how you like it.

This butter you can use in so many different ways, like in baking, in smoothies, add into sauces….I love this combination ; ricecake, nutbutter and sliced banana on top (especially when the nutbutter is on the salty side you get the salty/sweet combo that never fails ;=)

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